WORSE THAN SLAVERY PARCHMAN FARM AND THE ORDEAL OF JIM CROW JUSTICE

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Worse Than Slavery

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : 1439107742
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 22.24 MB
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In this sensitively told tale of suffering, brutality, and inhumanity, Worse Than Slavery is an epic history of race and punishment in the deepest South from emancipation to the civil rights era—and beyond. Immortalized in blues songs and movies like Cool Hand Luke and The Defiant Ones, Mississippi’s infamous Parchman State Penitentiary was, in the pre-civil rights south, synonymous with cruelty. Now, noted historian David Oshinsky gives us the true story of the notorious prison, drawing on police records, prison documents, folklore, blues songs, and oral history, from the days of cotton-field chain gangs to the 1960s, when Parchman was used to break the wills of civil rights workers who journeyed south on Freedom Rides.
Category: Social Science

Worse Than Slavery

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : 0684822989
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 87.15 MB
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Draws on police records, prison documents, and oral history to examine Mississippi's state penitentiary and Jim Crow justice, from the era of the cottonfield chain gangs to the 1960s
Category: Social Science

Worse Than Slavery

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : 0784818401
Genre :
File Size : 31.31 MB
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After the abolition of slavery in Mississippi, a prison rents out its inmates to perform slave-like labor on neighboring cotton plantations.
Category:

A Conspiracy So Immense

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : 9780195154245
Genre : History
File Size : 28.33 MB
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With a storyteller's eye for the dramatic, presentation of fact, and insightful interpretation of human complexity, Oshinsky uncovers the layers of myth to reveal the true Joe McCarthy and the forces that launched him to prominence and decline.
Category: History

Slavery By Another Name

Author : Douglas A. Blackmon
ISBN : 9781848314139
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.85 MB
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A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.
Category: Social Science

Polio

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : 0199726590
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 22.74 MB
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Here David Oshinsky tells the gripping story of the polio terror and of the intense effort to find a cure, from the March of Dimes to the discovery of the Salk and Sabin vaccines--and beyond. Drawing on newly available papers of Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin and other key players, Oshinsky paints a suspenseful portrait of the race for the cure, weaving a dramatic tale centered on the furious rivalry between Salk and Sabin. He also tells the story of Isabel Morgan, perhaps the most talented of all polio researchers, who might have beaten Salk to the prize if she had not retired to raise a family. Oshinsky offers an insightful look at the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which was founded in the 1930s by FDR and Basil O'Connor, it revolutionized fundraising and the perception of disease in America. Oshinsky also shows how the polio experience revolutionized the way in which the government licensed and tested new drugs before allowing them on the market, and the way in which the legal system dealt with manufacturers' liability for unsafe products. Finally, and perhaps most tellingly, Oshinsky reveals that polio was never the raging epidemic portrayed by the media, but in truth a relatively uncommon disease. But in baby-booming America--increasingly suburban, family-oriented, and hygiene-obsessed--the specter of polio, like the specter of the atomic bomb, soon became a cloud of terror over daily life. Both a gripping scientific suspense story and a provocative social and cultural history, Polio opens a fresh window onto postwar America.
Category: Social Science

Capital Punishment On Trial

Author : David M. Oshinsky
ISBN : STANFORD:36105215453510
Genre : History
File Size : 41.94 MB
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In his first book since the Pulitzer Prize--winning Polio: An American Story, renowned historian David Oshinsky takes a new and closer look at the Supreme Court's controversial and much-debated stances on capital punishment--in the landmark case of Furman v. Georgia. Career criminal William Furman shot and killed a homeowner during a 1967 burglary in Savannah, Georgia. Because it was a "black-on-white" crime in the racially troubled South, it also was an open-and-shut case. The trial took less than a day, and the nearly all-white jury rendered a death sentence. Aided by the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund, Furman's African-American attorney, Bobby Mayfield, doggedly appealed the verdict all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1972 overturned Furman's sentence by a narrow 5--4 vote, ruling that Georgia's capital punishment statute, and by implication all other state death-penalty laws, was so arbitrary and capricious as to violate the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against "cruel and unusual punishment." Furman effectively, if temporarily, halted capital punishment in the United States. Every death row inmate across the nation was resentenced to life in prison. The decision, however, did not rule the death penalty per se to be unconstitutional; rather, it struck down the laws that currently governed its application, leaving the states free to devise new ones that the Court might find acceptable. And this is exactly what happened. In the coming years, the Supreme Court would uphold an avalanche of state legislation endorsing the death penalty. Capital punishment would return stronger than ever, with many more defendants sentenced to death and eventually executed. Oshinsky demonstrates the troubling roles played by race and class and region in capital punishment. And he concludes by considering the most recent Supreme Court death-penalty cases involving minors and the mentally ill, as well as the impact of international opinion. Compact and engaging, Oshinsky's masterful study reflects a gift for empathy, an eye for the telling anecdote and portrait, and a talent for clarifying the complex and often confusing legal issues surrounding capital punishment.
Category: History

Down On Parchman Farm

Author : William Banks Taylor
ISBN : 0814250238
Genre : History
File Size : 43.46 MB
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"Down on Parchman Farm is a greatly revised edition of William Banks Taylor's Brokered Justice (1993). While Brokered Justice was a history of the prison system and prison reform in Mississippi, this new edition tells the story of Parchman Farm, from its beginnings as a penal farm at the turn of the century to the 1972 court decision that sealed its fate. Parchman Farm's story is rich in oral history. Taylor interviewed many former convicts, along with former employees of the penal system and a number of others who had some association with the farm. Their memories and opinions form the heart of his narrative. Their testimonies support Taylor's assertion that, for all its problems, Parchman Farm was for many years a remarkably effective and humane penal institution."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Category: History

One Dies Get Another

Author : Matthew J. Mancini
ISBN : 1570030839
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.16 MB
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A study of convict leasing in the post-Civil War American South, an institution of unrelieved brutality. The Southern States sought to reduce prison populations and generate revenue by leasing convicts to corporations and individuals thus creating a means of racial subordination.
Category: Social Science

First Available Cell

Author : Chad R. Trulson
ISBN : 9780292773707
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 27.94 MB
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Decades after the U.S. Supreme Court and certain governmental actions struck down racial segregation in the larger society, American prison administrators still boldly adhered to discriminatory practices. Not until 1975 did legislation prohibit racial segregation and discrimination in Texas prisons. However, vestiges of this practice endured behind prison walls. Charting the transformation from segregation to desegregation in Texas prisons—which resulted in Texas prisons becoming one of the most desegregated places in America—First Available Cell chronicles the pivotal steps in the process, including prison director George J. Beto's 1965 decision to allow inmates of different races to co-exist in the same prison setting, defying Southern norms. The authors also clarify the significant impetus for change that emerged in 1972, when a Texas inmate filed a lawsuit alleging racial segregation and discrimination in the Texas Department of Corrections. Perhaps surprisingly, a multiracial group of prisoners sided with the TDC, fearing that desegregated housing would unleash racial violence. Members of the security staff also feared and predicted severe racial violence. Nearly two decades after the 1972 lawsuit, one vestige of segregation remained in place: the double cell. Revealing the aftermath of racial desegregation within that 9 x 5 foot space, First Available Cell tells the story of one of the greatest social experiments with racial desegregation in American history.
Category: Social Science