Whose Harlem Is This Anyway

Author : Shannon King
ISBN : 9781479889082
Genre : History
File Size : 54.60 MB
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2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Winner of the Anna Julia Cooper/CLR James Award for Outstanding Book in Africana Studies presented by the National Council for Black Studies Demonstrates how Harlemite’s dynamic fight for their rights and neighborhood raised the black community’s racial consciousness and established Harlem’s legendary political culture In Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway?, Shannon King vividly uncovers early twentieth century Harlem as an intersection between the black intellectuals and artists who created the New Negro Renaissance and the working class who found fought daily to combat institutionalized racism and gender discrimination in both Harlem and across the city. New Negro activists, such as Hubert Harrison and Frank Crosswaith, challenged local forms of economic and racial inequality in attempts to breakdown the structural manifestations that upheld them. Insurgent stay-at-home black mothers took negligent landlords to court, complaining to magistrates about the absence of hot water and heat in their apartment buildings. Black men and women, propelling dishes, bricks, and other makeshift weapons from their apartment windows and their rooftops, retaliated against hostile policemen harassing blacks on the streets of Harlem. From the turn of the twentieth century to the Great Depression, black Harlemites mobilized around local issues—such as high rents, jobs, leisure, and police brutality—to make their neighborhood an autonomous black community. In Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway?, Shannon King demonstrates how, against all odds, the Harlemite’s dynamic fight for their rights and neighborhood raised the black community’s racial consciousness and established Harlem’s legendary political culture. By the end of the 1920s, Harlem had experience a labor strike, a tenant campaign for affordable rents, and its first race riot. These public forms of protest and discontent represented the dress rehearsal for black mass mobilization in the 1930s and 1940s. By studying blacks' immense investment in community politics, King makes visible the hidden stirrings of a social movement deeply invested in a Black Harlem. Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway? Is a vibrant story of the shaping of a community during a pivotal time in American History.
Category: History

Suspect Freedoms

Author : Nancy Raquel Mirabal
ISBN : 9780814759875
Genre : History
File Size : 62.81 MB
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Beginning in the early nineteenth century, Cubans migrated to New York City to organize and protest against Spanish colonial rule. While revolutionary wars raged in Cuba, expatriates envisioned, dissected, and redefined meanings of independence and nationhood. An underlying element was the concept of Cubanidad, a shared sense of what it meant to be Cuban. Deeply influenced by discussions of slavery, freedom, masculinity, and United States imperialism, the question of what and who constituted “being Cuban” remained in flux and often, suspect. The first book to explore Cuban racial and sexual politics in New York during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Suspect Freedoms chronicles the largely unexamined and often forgotten history of more than a hundred years of Cuban exile, migration, diaspora, and community formation. Nancy Raquel Mirabal delves into the rich cache of primary sources, archival documents, literary texts, club records, newspapers, photographs, and oral histories to write what Michel Rolph Trouillot has termed an “unthinkable history.” Situating this pivotal era within larger theoretical discussions of potential, future, visibility, and belonging, Mirabal shows how these transformations complicated meanings of territoriality, gender, race, power, and labor. She argues that slavery, nation, and the fear that Cuba would become “another Haiti” were critical in the making of early diasporic Cubanidades, and documents how, by the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Afro-Cubans were authors of their own experiences; organizing movements, publishing texts, and establishing important political, revolutionary, and social clubs. Meticulously documented and deftly crafted, Suspect Freedoms unravels a nuanced and vital history.
Category: History

Brokering Servitude

Author : Andrew Urban
ISBN : 9780814764749
Genre : History
File Size : 56.11 MB
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The history of domestic labor markets in 19th century America From the era of Irish Famine migration to the passage of quota restrictions in the 1920s, household domestic service was the single largest employer of women in the United States, and, in California, a pivotal occupation for male Chinese immigrants. Servants of both sexes accounted for eight percent of the total labor force – about one million people. In Brokering Servitude, Andrew Urban offers a history of these domestic servants, focusing on how Irish immigrant women, Chinese immigrant men, and American-born black women navigated the domestic labor market in the nineteenth century – a market in which they were forced to grapple with powerful racial and gendered discrimination. Through vivid examples like how post-famine Irish immigrants were enlisted to work as servants in exchange for relief, this book examines how race, citizenship, and the performance of domestic labor relate to visions of American expansion. Because household service was undesirable work stigmatized as unfree, brokers were integral to steering and compelling women, men, and children into this labor. By the end of the nineteenth century, the federal government became a major broker of domestic labor through border controls, and immigration officials became important actors in dictating which workers were available for domestic labor and under what conditions they could be contracted. Drawing on a range of sources – from political cartoons to immigrant case files to novels – Brokering Servitude connects Asian immigration, European immigration, and internal, black migration. The book ultimately demonstrates the ways in which employers pitted these groups against each other in competition for not only servant positions, but also certain forms of social inclusion, offering important insights into an oft-overlooked area of American history.
Category: History

Making The Empire Work

Author : Daniel E. Bender
ISBN : 9781479856220
Genre : History
File Size : 78.98 MB
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Millions of laborers, from the Philippines to the Caribbean, performed the work of the United States empire. Forging a global economy connecting the tropics to the industrial center, workers harvested sugar, cleaned hotel rooms, provided sexual favors, and filled military ranks. Placing working men and women at the center of the long history of the U.S. empire, these essays offer new stories of empire that intersect with the “grand narratives” of diplomatic affairs at the national and international levels. Missile defense, Cold War showdowns, development politics, military combat, tourism, and banana economics share something in common—they all have labor histories. This collection challenges historians to consider the labor that formed, worked, confronted, and rendered the U.S. empire visible. The U.S. empire is a project of global labor mobilization, coercive management, military presence, and forced cultural encounter. Together, the essays in this volume recognize the United States as a global imperial player whose systems of labor mobilization and migration stretched from Central America to West Africa to the United States itself. Workers are also the key actors in this volume. Their stories are multi-vocal, as workers sometimes defied the U.S. empire’s rhetoric of civilization, peace, and stability and at other times navigated its networks or benefited from its profits. Their experiences reveal the gulf between the American ‘denial of empire’ and the lived practice of management, resource exploitation, and military exigency. When historians place labor and working people at the center, empire appears as a central dynamic of U.S. history.
Category: History

Seitenwechsel

Author : Nella Larsen
ISBN : 9783908778196
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 86.80 MB
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"Nella Larsens Roman "Seitenwechsel" ist das Gegenstück zu Scott Fitzgeralds "Der große Gatsby"." Irene Redfield flieht vor der Hitze eines heißen Sommertages ins Dachrestaurant des Drayton Hotels in Chicago. Sie traut ihren Augen kaum, als sie hier ihre Freundin aus Kindertagen wiedertrifft. Clare Kendry ist nach dem frühen Tod ihres Vaters bei weißen Verwandten aufgewachsen und der Kontakt zwischen den Freundinnen abgerissen. Zwei Jahre später zieht Clare nach New York und meldet sich bei Irene, die in Harlem lebt, während Clare in der Welt der Weißen zu Hause ist. Clare ist mit einem Rassisten verheiratet, der nicht auch nur entfernt von ihrer schwarzen Herkunft ahnt. Zudem beunruhigt Irene mehr und mehr, daß Clare eine magische Wirkung auf ihren eigenen Ehemann zu haben scheint. Clare, die Wanderin zwischen den Welten, liebt die Gefahr und das Spiel mit dem Feuer - und droht ständig, sich zu verbrennen.
Category: Fiction

Sexus Und Herrschaft

Author : Kate Millett
ISBN : 3420046138
Genre : Sex in literature
File Size : 58.76 MB
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Frau / Unterdruckung
Category: Sex in literature

Angry White Men

Author : Michael Kimmel
ISBN : 9783280038987
Genre : Juvenile Fiction
File Size : 47.49 MB
Format : PDF
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Die Supermacht USA befindet sich in einer tiefen Identitätskrise. Einst berühmt für ihre pragmatische Kompromissbereitschaft stehen sich Republikaner und Demokraten unversöhnlich gegenüber, gewinnen ehemals politische Randgruppen wie die Tea Party enormen politischen und gesellschaftlichen Einfluss. Das Land radikalisiert sich und die weiße männliche Bevölkerung spielt dabei eine entscheidende Rolle. Wer sind die zornigen weißen Amerikaner, die ihren „Way of Life" so gefährdet sehen, dass sie zum radikalen Widerstand gegen jeden bereit sind, der ihre Anschauungen nicht teilt? Woher rührt die Wut auf Frauenemanzipation und Immigranten, auf Farbige und Homosexuelle, auf die Gleichstellung der Geschlechter und generell auf „die im Weißen Haus"? Dieses Buch zeichnet das beklemmende Porträt einer vorrangig männlichen Bewegung, deren Angst vor dem eigenen Bedeutungsverlust, vor dem Verlust amerikanischer Männlichkeit und Dominanz nicht nur die kommenden Präsidentschaftswahlen bestimmen wird, sondern darüber hinaus auch die amerikanische Außenpolitik - also uns.
Category: Juvenile Fiction

Cities Contested

Author : Martin Baumeister
ISBN : 9783593436562
Genre : History
File Size : 30.15 MB
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Die 1970er-Jahre gelten in der deutschen Zeitgeschichte als Epoche eines tief greifenden sozialen Wandels, eines "Strukturbruchs " im Übergang von der Industriemoderne zur postfordistischen Gesellschaft. Die Beiträge dieses Bandes widmen sich diesem Jahrzehnt erstmals aus einer stadthistorischen Perspektive und stellen dabei Entwicklungen in Westdeutschland und Italien einander gegenüber. In Fallstudien zu Städten vom Ruhrgebiet bis Sizilien wird untersucht, wie sich die Umbrüche dieser Zeit im Brennpunkt von städtischem Raum und städtischer Gesellschaft verdichten, als "urbane Krise" wahrgenommen und verhandelt werden und sich in Konflikten in der städtischen Politik sowie Kämpfen in und um die Stadt manifestieren.
Category: History

Die Taugenichtse

Author : Samuel Selvon
ISBN : 9783423431927
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 27.26 MB
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Moses, Big City, Fünf-nach-zwölf und die anderen setzen große Hoffnungen in ihr neues Leben im »Zentrum der Welt«, so nennen sie das London der Nachkriegszeit. Sie sind aus der Karibik hierhergekommen, jetzt staunen sie über die Dampfwolken vor ihren Mündern. Und wenn der Wochenlohn wieder nicht reicht, jagen sie eben die Tauben auf dem Dach. Kapitulation? Niemals! Stattdessen beginnen die Überlebenskünstler, sich neu zu erfinden – und ihre neue Heimat gleich mit. Samuel Selvons Ton zwischen kreolischem Straßenslang und balladesker Suada setzt sich sofort ins Ohr. Bedingungslos aufrichtig erzählt Selvon von den ersten Einwanderern Englands, die das Land für immer verändert haben – sein Denken, seine Sprache, sein Selbstverständnis. Die literarische Entdeckung!
Category: Fiction