TRANSLATION AND THE SPANISH EMPIRE IN THE AMERICAS

Download Translation And The Spanish Empire In The Americas ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to TRANSLATION AND THE SPANISH EMPIRE IN THE AMERICAS book pdf for free now.

Translation And The Spanish Empire In The Americas

Author : Roberto A. Valdeón
ISBN : 9789027269409
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
File Size : 41.77 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 157
Read : 805

Two are the starting points of this book. On the one hand, the use of Doña Marina/La Malinche as a symbol of the violation of the Americas by the Spanish conquerors as well as a metaphor of her treason to the Mexican people. On the other, the role of the translations of Bartolomé de las Casas’s Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias in the creation and expansion of the Spanish Black Legend. The author aims to go beyond them by considering the role of translators and interpreters during the early colonial period in Spanish America and by looking at the translations of the Spanish chronicles as instrumental in the promotion of other European empires. The book discusses literary, religious and administrative documents and engages in a dialogue with other disciplines that can provide a more nuanced view of the role of translation, and of the mediators, during the controversial encounter/clash between Europeans and Amerindians.
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Metaphors Of Dispossession

Author : Gesa Mackenthun
ISBN : 0806129530
Genre : History
File Size : 37.71 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 590
Read : 1296

German scholar Makenthun analyzes English and Spanish narratives of the discovery and colonization of America from the Caribbean and Mexico north to Virginia and New England. She shows how Europeans wrote themselves into possession by creating an ideology of native savagery and rightful territorial
Category: History

Incomparable Empires

Author : Gayle Rogers
ISBN : 9780231542982
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 36.68 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 657
Read : 1233

The Spanish-American War of 1898 seems to mark a turning point in both geopolitical and literary histories. The victorious American empire ascended and dominated the globe culturally in the twentieth century, while the once-mighty Spanish empire declined and became a minor state in the world republic of letters. But what if this narrative relies on several faulty assumptions, and what if key modernist figures in both America and Spain radically rewrote these histories—at the foundational moment of modern literary studies? Rogers follows the networks of American and Spanish writers, translators, and movements to uncover surprising arguments that forged the politics and aesthetics of modernism. He revisits the role of empire—from its institutions to its cognitive effects—in shaping a nation’s literature and culture. He reads the provocative, often counterintuitive arguments of John Dos Passos, who held that “American literature” could only flourish if the expanding U.S. empire collapsed like Spain’s. He follows Ezra Pound’s use of Spanish poetry to structure the Cantos and the poet Juan Ramón Jiménez’s interpretations of modernismo across several languages. And he tracks the controversial theorization of a Harlem-Havana-Madrid nexus for black writing, and Ernest Hemingway’s development of a version of cubist Spanglish in For Whom the Bell Tolls.
Category: Literary Criticism

The Royal Treasuries Of The Spanish Empire In America

Author : John J. TePaske
ISBN : 0822310422
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 64.92 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 432
Read : 1137

The Royal Treasuries of the Spanish Empire in America provides records of Spanish colonial treasuries of various New World administrative centers. In this volume, the fourth in the series, the authors have compiled quantitative date on the fiscal structure of the presidency of Quito that will be an invaluable source for reconstructing the economic, political, and social history of eighteenth-century Ecuador.
Category: Business & Economics

Translating Empire

Author : Laura Lomas
ISBN : 9780822389415
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 61.96 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 967
Read : 1085

In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas uncovers how late nineteenth-century Latino migrant writers developed a prescient critique of U.S. imperialism, one that prefigures many of the concerns about empire, race, and postcolonial subjectivity animating American studies today. During the 1880s and early 1890s, the Cuban journalist, poet, and revolutionary José Martí and other Latino migrants living in New York City translated North American literary and cultural texts into Spanish. Lomas reads the canonical literature and popular culture of the United States in the Gilded Age through the eyes of Martí and his fellow editors, activists, orators, and poets. In doing so, she reveals how, in the process of translating Anglo-American culture into a Latino-American idiom, the Latino migrant writers invented a modernist aesthetics to criticize U.S. expansionism and expose Anglo stereotypes of Latin Americans. Lomas challenges longstanding conceptions about Martí through readings of neglected texts and reinterpretations of his major essays. Against the customary view that emphasizes his strong identification with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman, the author demonstrates that over several years, Martí actually distanced himself from Emerson’s ideas and conveyed alarm at Whitman’s expansionist politics. She questions the association of Martí with pan-Americanism, pointing out that in the 1880s, the Cuban journalist warned against foreign geopolitical influence imposed through ostensibly friendly meetings and the promotion of hemispheric peace and “free” trade. Lomas finds Martí undermining racialized and sexualized representations of America in his interpretations of Buffalo Bill and other rituals of westward expansion, in his self-published translation of Helen Hunt Jackson’s popular romance novel Ramona, and in his comments on writing that stereotyped Latino/a Americans as inherently unfit for self-government. With Translating Empire, Lomas recasts the contemporary practice of American studies in light of Martí’s late-nineteenth-century radical decolonizing project.
Category: Literary Criticism

Seven Myths Of The Spanish Conquest

Author : Matthew Restall
ISBN : 0198036434
Genre : History
File Size : 26.63 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 383
Read : 708

Here is an intriguing exploration of the ways in which the history of the Spanish Conquest has been misread and passed down to become popular knowledge of these events. The book offers a fresh account of the activities of the best-known conquistadors and explorers, including Columbus, Cortés, and Pizarro. Using a wide array of sources, historian Matthew Restall highlights seven key myths, uncovering the source of the inaccuracies and exploding the fallacies and misconceptions behind each myth. This vividly written and authoritative book shows, for instance, that native Americans did not take the conquistadors for gods and that small numbers of vastly outnumbered Spaniards did not bring down great empires with stunning rapidity. We discover that Columbus was correctly seen in his lifetime--and for decades after--as a briefly fortunate but unexceptional participant in efforts involving many southern Europeans. It was only much later that Columbus was portrayed as a great man who fought against the ignorance of his age to discover the new world. Another popular misconception--that the Conquistadors worked alone--is shattered by the revelation that vast numbers of black and native allies joined them in a conflict that pitted native Americans against each other. This and other factors, not the supposed superiority of the Spaniards, made conquests possible. The Conquest, Restall shows, was more complex--and more fascinating--than conventional histories have portrayed it. Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest offers a richer and more nuanced account of a key event in the history of the Americas.
Category: History

Spain S Long Shadow

Author : María DeGuzmán
ISBN : 9781452907291
Genre : History
File Size : 43.23 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 208
Read : 1192

Reveals the dependence of American ethnic identity on Spain and Spanish imperialism.
Category: History

The Discovery And Conquest Of Peru

Author : Pedro de Cieza de León
ISBN : 9780822382508
Genre : History
File Size : 79.97 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 285
Read : 1112

Dazzled by the sight of the vast treasure of gold and silver being unloaded at Seville’s docks in 1537, a teenaged Pedro de Cieza de León vowed to join the Spanish effort in the New World, become an explorer, and write what would become the earliest historical account of the conquest of Peru. Available for the first time in English, this history of Peru is based largely on interviews with Cieza’s conquistador compatriates, as well as with Indian informants knowledgeable of the Incan past. Alexandra Parma Cook and Noble David Cook present this recently discovered third book of a four-part chronicle that provides the most thorough and definitive record of the birth of modern Andean America. It describes with unparalleled detail the exploration of the Pacific coast of South America led by Francisco Pizarro and Diego de Almagro, the imprisonment and death of the Inca Atahualpa, the Indian resistance, and the ultimate Spanish domination. Students and scholars of Latin American history and conquest narratives will welcome the publication of this volume.
Category: History

Translation Nation

Author : Héctor Tobar
ISBN : UOM:39015060833020
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 66.17 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 696
Read : 965

Examines how Spanish-speaking people in the United States are changing the notion of "American" by citing their new role as the largest American minority, the author's family history, and complex variations of cultures.
Category: Social Science

Empires Of God

Author : Linda Gregerson
ISBN : 9780812222609
Genre : History
File Size : 51.63 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 867
Read : 466

Religion and empire were inseparable forces in the early modern Atlantic world. Religious passions and conflicts drove much of the expansionist energy of post-Reformation Europe, providing both a rationale and a practical mode of organizing the dispersal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people from the Old World to the New World. Exhortations to conquer new peoples were the lingua franca of Western imperialism, and men like the mystically inclined Christopher Columbus were genuinely inspired to risk their lives and their fortunes to bring the gospel to the Americas. And in the thousands of religious refugees seeking asylum from the vicious wars of religion that tore the continent apart in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, these visionary explorers found a ready pool of migrants—English Puritans and Quakers, French Huguenots, German Moravians, Scots-Irish Presbyterians—equally willing to risk life and limb for a chance to worship God in their own way. Focusing on the formative period of European exploration, settlement, and conquest in the Americas, from roughly 1500 to 1760, Empires of God brings together historians and literary scholars of the English, French, and Spanish Americas around a common set of questions: How did religious communities and beliefs create empires, and how did imperial structures transform New World religions? How did Europeans and Native Americans make sense of each other's spiritual systems, and what acts of linguistic and cultural transition did this entail? What was the role of violence in New World religious encounters? Together, the essays collected here demonstrate the power of religious ideas and narratives to create kingdoms both imagined and real.
Category: History