ROOT SHOCK HOW TEARING UP CITY NEIGHBORHOODS HURTS AMERICA AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT

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Root Shock

Author : Mindy Thompson Fullilove
ISBN : 9781613320204
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67.17 MB
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Dr. Mindy Thompson Fullilove, a clinical psychiatrist, exposes the devastating outcome of decades of urban renewal projects to our nation’s marginalized communities. Examining the traumatic stress of “root shock” in three African American communities and similar widespread damage in other cities, she makes an impassioned and powerful argument against the continued invasive and unjust development practices of displacing poor neighborhoods.
Category: Social Science

Urban Alchemy

Author : Mindy Thompson Fullilove
ISBN : 9781613320129
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 28.76 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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What if divided neighborhoods were causing public health problems? What if a new approach to planning and design could tackle both the built environment and collective well-being at the same time? What if cities could help each other? Dr. Mindy Fullilove, the acclaimed author of Root Shock, uses her unique perspective as a public health psychiatrist to explore ways of healing social and spatial fractures simultaneously. Using the work of French urbanist Michel Cantal-Dupart as a guide, Fullilove takes readers on a tour of successful collaborative interventions that repair cities and make communities whole.
Category: Social Science

Sisters Of The Earth

Author : Lorraine Anderson
ISBN : 9781400033218
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 80.79 MB
Format : PDF
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Presents an anthology of poetry, essays, stories, and journal entries by Emily Dickinson, Zora Neale Hurston, Diane Ackerman, Ursula Le Guin, Terry Tempest Williams, Willa Cather, and many others who offer a personal view of humankind's relationship with the natural world. Original.
Category: Literary Collections

Urban Fortunes

Author : John R. Logan
ISBN : 9780520254282
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 21.34 MB
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"Twenty years after publication, Urban Fortunes remains the best book on urban sociology around. Starting from a political economy analysis, Logan and Molotch develop a picture of the formative processes creating the contemporary American city while managing to avoid the pitfalls of determinism."—Susan Fainstein, Harvard University
Category: Social Science

The House Of Joshua

Author : Mindy Thompson Fullilove
ISBN : 0803269064
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 67.17 MB
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The author uses nine family stories to illustrate the psychological importance of place.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Urban Alchemy

Author : Mindy Thompson Fullilove
ISBN : 9781613320129
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 82.42 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 751
Read : 733

What if divided neighborhoods were causing public health problems? What if a new approach to planning and design could tackle both the built environment and collective well-being at the same time? What if cities could help each other? Dr. Mindy Fullilove, the acclaimed author of Root Shock, uses her unique perspective as a public health psychiatrist to explore ways of healing social and spatial fractures simultaneously. Using the work of French urbanist Michel Cantal-Dupart as a guide, Fullilove takes readers on a tour of successful collaborative interventions that repair cities and make communities whole.
Category: Social Science

Toward Equity In Health

Author : Barbara C. Wallace, PhD
ISBN : 0826103685
Genre : Medical
File Size : 26.50 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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This essential collection presents a state-of-the-art framework for how workers in public health and related disciplines should conceptualize health disparities and how they should be addressed worldwide. The contributors, who are leading public health professionals, educators, and practitioners in complimentary fields advance new evidence-based models designed to mobilize and educate the next generation of research and practice. The resulting chapters articulate new theory, procedures, and policies; the legacy of racism; community-based participatory research; new internet technology; training community workers and educators; closing the education and health gap; and addressing the needs of special populations. Toward Equity in Health is an essential book for all who are working toward global health equity-whether in health education, health promotion, disease prevention, public health, the health care delivery system, or patient- and population level health.
Category: Medical

Crossing Broadway

Author : Robert W. Snyder
ISBN : 9780801455179
Genre : History
File Size : 73.15 MB
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In the 1970s, when the South Bronx burned and the promise of New Deal New York and postwar America gave way to despair, the people of Washington Heights at the northern tip of Manhattan were increasingly vulnerable. The Heights had long been a neighborhood where generations of newcomers—Irish, Jewish, Greek, African American, Cuban, and Puerto Rican—carved out better lives in their adopted city. But as New York City shifted from an industrial base to a service economy, new immigrants from the Dominican Republic struggled to gain a foothold. Then the crack epidemic of the 1980s and the drug wars sent Washington Heights to the brink of an urban nightmare. But it did not go over the edge. Robert W. Snyder's Crossing Broadway tells how disparate groups overcame their mutual suspicions to rehabilitate housing, build new schools, restore parks, and work with the police to bring safety to streets racked by crime and fear. It shows how a neighborhood once nicknamed "Frankfurt on the Hudson" for its large population of German Jews became “Quisqueya Heights”—the home of the nation’s largest Dominican community. The story of Washington Heights illuminates New York City’s long passage from the Great Depression and World War II through the urban crisis to the globalization and economic inequality of the twenty-first century. Washington Heights residents played crucial roles in saving their neighborhood, but its future as a home for working-class and middle-class people is by no means assured. The growing gap between rich and poor in contemporary New York puts new pressure on the Heights as more affluent newcomers move into buildings that once sustained generations of wage earners and the owners of small businesses. Crossing Broadway is based on historical research, reporting, and oral histories. Its narrative is powered by the stories of real people whose lives illuminate what was won and lost in northern Manhattan’s journey from the past to the present. A tribute to a great American neighborhood, this book shows how residents learned to cross Broadway—over the decades a boundary that has separated black and white, Jews and Irish, Dominican-born and American-born—and make common cause in pursuit of one of the most precious rights: the right to make a home and build a better life in New York City.
Category: History

Gentrification Of The City

Author : Neil Smith
ISBN : 9781134563944
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 87.62 MB
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This book was first published in 1986.
Category: Architecture

Murder In The Model City

Author : Paul Bass
ISBN : 9780786735853
Genre : History
File Size : 44.72 MB
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May 20, 1969: Four members of the revolutionary Black Panther Party trudge through woods along the edges of the Coginchaug River outside of New Haven, Connecticut. Gunshots shatter the silence. Three men emerge from the woods. Soon, two are in police custody. One flees across the country. Nine Panthers would be tried for crimes committed that night, including National Chairman Bobby Seale, extradited from California with the aide of Panther nemesis, California Governor Ronald Reagan. Activists of all denominations descended on the New England city--and the campus of Yale. The Nixon administration sent 4,000 National Guardsmen. U.S. military tanks lined the streets outside of New Haven. In this white-knuckle journey through a turbulent America, Doug Rae and Paul Bass let us eavesdrop on late-night meetings between Yale President, Kingman Brewster, and radical activists, including Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman, as they try to avert disaster. Meanwhile, most heartrending of all is the never-before-told story of Warren Kimbro--star community worker turned Panther assassin--who faces an uphill battle to turn his life around.
Category: History