Revolt

Author : Matthew Liebmann
ISBN : 9780816599653
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 23.37 MB
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Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University. The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 is the most renowned colonial uprisings in the history of the American Southwest. Traditional text-based accounts tend to focus on the revolt and the Spaniards' reconquest in 1692--completely skipping over the years of indigenous independence that occurred in between. Revolt boldly breaks out of this mold and examines the aftermath of the uprising in colonial New Mexico, focusing on the radical changes it instigated in Pueblo culture and society. In addition to being the first book-length history of the revolt that incorporates archaeological evidence as a primary source of data, this volume is one of a kind in its attempt to put these events into the larger context of Native American cultural revitalization. Despite the fact that the only surviving records of the revolt were written by Spanish witnesses and contain certain biases, author Matthew Liebmann finds unique ways to bring a fresh perspective to Revolt. Most notably, he uses his hands-on experience at Ancestral Pueblo archaeological sites--four Pueblo villages constructed between 1680 and 1696 in the Jemez province of New Mexico--to provide an understanding of this period that other treatments have yet to accomplish. By analyzing ceramics, architecture, and rock art of the Pueblo Revolt era, he sheds new light on a period often portrayed as one of unvarying degradation and dissention among Pueblos. A compelling read, Revolt's "blood-and-thunder" story successfully ties together archaeology, history, and ethnohistory to add a new dimension to this uprising and its aftermath.
Category: Social Science

A Tale Of Three Villages

Author : Liam Frink
ISBN : 9780816531097
Genre : History
File Size : 32.12 MB
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"The book is an investigation of culture change among the Yup'ik Eskimo people of the southwestern Alaskan coast from the time of European/Russian contact through the mid-twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.
Category: History

Decolonizing Indigenous Histories

Author : Maxine Oland
ISBN : 9780816504084
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 69.75 MB
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This leading-edge volume explores how the inclusion of indigenous histories in analyses of colonialism, collaboration with contemporary communities and scholars across the subfields of anthropology, and the engagement with these histories and with indigenous peoples contributes constructively to the decolonization of archaeology as well as to broader projects of social justice.
Category: Social Science

Crafting History In The Northern Plains

Author : Mark D. Mitchell
ISBN : 9780816521296
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 35.15 MB
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In Crafting History in the Northern Plains Mark D. Mitchell shows the crucial role archaeological methods and archaeological data can play in producing trans-Columbian histories. Mitchell provides a regional synthesis of communities located at the confluence of the Heart and Missouri rivers, home to the Mandan people for more than five centuries.
Category: Social Science

The Pueblo Revolt And The Mythology Of Conquest

Author : Michael Vincent Wilcox
ISBN : 9780520944589
Genre : History
File Size : 69.38 MB
Format : PDF
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In a groundbreaking book that challenges familiar narratives of discontinuity, disease-based demographic collapse, and acculturation, Michael V. Wilcox upends many deeply held assumptions about native peoples in North America. His provocative book poses the question, What if we attempted to explain their presence in contemporary society five hundred years after Columbus instead of their disappearance or marginalization? Wilcox looks in particular at the 1680 Pueblo Revolt in colonial New Mexico, the most successful indigenous rebellion in the Americas, as a case study for dismantling the mythology of the perpetually vanishing Indian. Bringing recent archaeological findings to bear on traditional historical accounts, Wilcox suggests that a more profitable direction for understanding the history of Native cultures should involve analyses of issues such as violence, slavery, and the creative responses they generated.
Category: History

Children Of Coyote Missionaries Of Saint Francis

Author : Steven W. Hackel
ISBN : 9780807839010
Genre : History
File Size : 62.26 MB
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Recovering lost voices and exploring issues intimate and institutional, this sweeping examination of Spanish California illuminates Indian struggles against a confining colonial order and amidst harrowing depopulation. To capture the enormous challenges Indians confronted, Steven W. Hackel integrates textual and quantitative sources and weaves together analyses of disease and depopulation, marriage and sexuality, crime and punishment, and religious, economic, and political change. As colonization reduced their numbers and remade California, Indians congregated in missions, where they forged communities under Franciscan oversight. Yet missions proved disastrously unhealthful and coercive, as Franciscans sought control over Indians' beliefs and instituted unfamiliar systems of labor and punishment. Even so, remnants of Indian groups still survived when Mexican officials ended Franciscan rule in the 1830s. Many regained land and found strength in ancestral cultures that predated the Spaniards' arrival. At this study's heart are the dynamic interactions in and around Mission San Carlos Borromeo between Monterey region Indians (the Children of Coyote) and Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and settlers. Hackel places these local developments in the context of the California mission system and draws comparisons between California and other areas of the Spanish Borderlands and colonial America. Concentrating on the experiences of the Costanoan and Esselen peoples during the colonial period, Children of Coyote concludes with an epilogue that carries the story of their survival to the present day.
Category: History

An Archaeology Of Doings

Author : Severin M. Fowles
ISBN : 1934691569
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 73.13 MB
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"There is an unsettling paradox in the anthropology of religion. Modern understandings of "religion" emerged out of a specifically Western genealogy, and recognizing this, many anthropologists have become deeply suspicious of claims that such understandings can be applied with fidelity to premodern or non-Western contexts. And yet, archaeologists now write about "religion" and "ritual" with greater ease than ever, even though their deeply premodern and fully non-Western objects of study would seem to make the use of these concepts especially fraught. In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos--prior to missionization--did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as "doings." Fowles then outlines a new archaeology of doings that takes us far beyond the familiar terrain of premodern religion."--Publisher's website.
Category: Social Science

The Archaeology Of Ethnogenesis

Author : Barbara L. Voss
ISBN : 9780520931954
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.87 MB
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This innovative work of historical archaeology illuminates the genesis of the Californios, a community of military settlers who forged a new identity on the northwest edge of Spanish North America. Since 1993, Barbara L. Voss has conducted archaeological excavations at the Presidio of San Francisco, founded by Spain during its colonization of California's central coast. Her research at the Presidio forms the basis for this rich study of cultural identity formation, or ethnogenesis, among the diverse peoples who came from widespread colonized populations to serve at the Presidio. Through a close investigation of the landscape, architecture, ceramics, clothing, and other aspects of material culture, she traces shifting contours of race and sexuality in colonial California.
Category: Social Science

How Chiefs Come To Power

Author : Timothy K. Earle
ISBN : 0804728569
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64.7 MB
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This book is basically about power-how people came to acquire it and the implications that contrasting paths to power had for the development of societies. Earle argues that chiefdoms, being a regional polity with governance over a population of a few thousand to tens of thousands of people, and with some social stratification, possessed the same fundamental dynamics as those of states, and that the origin of states is to be understood in the emergence and development of chiefdoms. His arguments are developed by three case studies-Denmark during the Neolithic and early Bronze Age (2300-1300) BC, the high Andes of Peru from the early chiefdoms through the Inka conquest (AD 500-1534), and Hawai'i from early settlement to its incorporation in the world economy (AD 800-1824). After summarizing the cultural history of the three societies over a thousand years, he considers the sources of chiefly power-the economy, military power and ideology-and how these sources were linked together.
Category: Social Science

Community Based Archaeology

Author : Sonya Atalay
ISBN : 9780520273351
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 37.34 MB
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"Community Based Participatory Research in archaeology finally comes of age with Atalay's long-anticipated volume. She promotes a collaborative approach to knowledge gathering, interpretation, and use that benefits descendant communities and archaeological practitioners, contributing to a more relevant, rewarding, and responsible archaeology. This is essential reading for anyone who asks why we do archaeology, for whom, and how best can it be done." - George Nicholas, author of Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists "Sonya Atalay shows archaeologists how the process of Community Based Participatory Research can move our efforts at collaboration with local communities beyond theory and good intentions to a sustainable practice. This is a game-changing book that every archaeologist must read." - Randall H. McGuire, author of Archaeology as Political Action
Category: Social Science