HOPI ORAL TRADITION AND THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF IDENTITY

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Hopi Oral Tradition And The Archaeology Of Identity

Author : Wesley Bernardini
ISBN : 9780816532919
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 43.37 MB
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As contemporary Native Americans assert the legacy of their ancestors, there is increasing debate among archaeologists over the methods and theories used to reconstruct prehistoric identity and the movement of social groups. This is especially problematic with respect to the emergence of southwestern tribes, which involved shifting populations and identities over the course of more than a thousand years. Wesley Bernardini now draws on an unconventional source, Hopi traditional knowledge, to show how hypotheses that are developed from oral tradition can stimulate new and productive ways to think about the archaeological record. Focusing on insights that oral tradition has to offer about general processes of prehistoric migration and identity formation, he describes how each Hopi clan acquired its particular identity from the experiences it accumulated on its unique migration pathway. This pattern of “serial migration” by small social groups often saw the formation of villages by clans that briefly came together and then moved off again independently, producing considerable social diversity both within and among villages. Using Anderson Mesa and Homol’ovi as case studies, Bernardini presents architectural and demographic data suggesting that the fourteenth century occupation of these regions was characterized by population flux and diversity consistent with the serial migration model. He offers an analysis of rock art motifs—focusing on those used as clan symbols—to evaluate the diversity of group identities, then presents a compositional analysis of Jeddito Yellow Ware pottery to evaluate the diversity of these groups’ eventual migration destinations. Evidence supporting serial migration greatly complicates existing notions of links between ancient and modern social groups, with important implications for the implementation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Bernardini’s work clearly demonstrates that studies of cultural affiliation must take into account the fluid nature of population movements and identity in the prehistoric landscape. It takes a decisive step toward better understanding the major demographic change that occurred on the Colorado Plateau from 1275 to 1400 and presents a strategy for improving the reconstruction of cultural identity in the past.
Category: Social Science

Archaeological Theory Today

Author : Ian Hodder
ISBN : 9780745681009
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 57.47 MB
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Now in a revised and updated second edition, this volume provides an authoritative account of the current status of archaeological theory, as presented by some of its major exponents and innovators over recent decades. It summarizes the latest developments in the field and looks to its future, exploring some of the cutting-edge ideas at the forefront of the discipline. The volume captures the diversity of contemporary archaeological theory. Some authors argue for an approach close to the natural sciences, others for an engagement with cultural debate about representation of the past. Some minimize the relevance of culture to societal change, while others see it as central; some focus on the contingent and the local, others on long-term evolution. While few practitioners in theoretical archaeology would today argue for a unified disciplinary approach, the authors in this volume increasingly see links and convergences between their perspectives. The volume also reflects archaeology's new openness to external influences, as well as the desire to contribute to wider debates. The contributors examine ways in which archaeological evidence contributes to theories of evolutionary psychology, as well as to the social sciences in general, where theories of social relationships, agency, landscape and identity are informed by the long-term perspective of archaeology. The new edition of Archaeological Theory Today will continue to be essential reading for students and scholars in archaeology and in the social sciences more generally.
Category: Social Science

Footprints Of Hopi History

Author : Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma
ISBN : 9780816538379
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 52.3 MB
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Kukveni—footprints—are a powerful historical metaphor that the Hopi people use to comprehend their tangible heritage. Hopis say that the deity Máasaw instructed their ancestors to leave footprints during their migrations from their origin place to their home today as evidence that they had fulfilled a spiritual pact to serve as stewards of his land. Today’s Hopis understand these footprints to be the archaeological remains of former settlements—pottery sherds, stone tools, petroglyphs, and other physical evidence of past use and occupation of the land. The fourteen chapters in Footprints of Hopi History: Hopihiniwtiput Kukveni’at focus on these Hopi footprints as they are understood through a variety of research techniques, including archaeology, ethnography, documentary history, plant genetics, and educational outreach. The editors and contributors offer fresh and innovative perspectives on Hopi archaeology and history, and demonstrate how one tribe has significantly advanced knowledge about its past through collaboration with archaeologists and cultural anthropologists. The book features managerial uses of research, cultural landscape theory, use of GIS in research, archaeological interpretations of social identity and immigration, analysis of corn genetics, heritage education of youth, and research of oral traditions and documentary history. Footprints of Hopi History highlights the Hopi tribe’s leadership in sustained efforts to create bridges between tribal goals and anthropology, forging a path for others to follow. Contributors E. Charles Adams Wesley Bernardini Joëlle Clark Chip Colwell T. J. Ferguson Dennis Gilpin Kelley Hays-Gilpin George Gumerman IV Saul L. Hedquist Maren P. Hopkins Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma Lee Wayne Lomayestewa Patrick D. Lyons Shirley Powell Gregson Schachner Thomas E. Sheridan Mark D. Varien Laurie D. Webster Peter M. Whiteley Michael Yeatts
Category: Social Science

Hopi History In Stone

Author : Wesley Bernardini
ISBN : MINN:31951D02914514R
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 26.37 MB
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Accompanying DVD-ROM contains figures and databases from Arizona State Museum Archaeological Series 200.
Category: Social Science

Collaboration In Archaeological Practice

Author : John Stephen Colwell-Chanthaphonh
ISBN : 0759110549
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
File Size : 53.6 MB
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In Collaboration in Archaeological Practice, prominent archaeologists reflect on their experiences involving collaboration with descendant communities (peoples whose ancestors are the subject of archaeological research).
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Archaeology Without Borders

Author : Laurie D. Webster
ISBN : WISC:89097005441
Genre : History
File Size : 45.43 MB
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Offers a synthesis of early agricultural adaptations in the region, groundbreaking archaeological research on social identity, and data previously not readily available to English-speaking readers. The twenty-four essays discuss early agriculture, social identity, and cultural landscapes, as well as economic and social interactions within the area now encompassed by northern Mexico and the US Southwest. Contributors examining early agricultural adaptations offer models for understanding the transition to agriculture, explore relationships between the spread of agriculture and Uto-Aztecan migrations, and present data from Arizona, New Mexico, and Chihuahua. Contributors focusing on social identity discuss migration, enculturation, social boundaries, and ethnic identities. They draw on case studies that include diverse artefact classes -- rock art, lithics, architecture, murals, ceramics, cordage, sandals, baskets, faunal remains, and oral histories. Mexican scholars present data from Chihuahua, Durango, Zacatecas, Michoacan, Coahuila, and Nuevo Leon. They address topics including Spanish-indigenous conflicts, archaeological history, cultural landscapes, and interactions among Mesoamerica, northern Mexico, and the US Southwest.
Category: History

The Archaeology Of Perry Mesa And Its World

Author : David R. Wilcox
ISBN : 0971878692
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 27.8 MB
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A study intitiated by the Agua Fria National Monument and conducted by the Western Mapping Company and the Museum of Northern Arizona, explores the Perry Mesa site in Yavapai Country, Arizona, documents the collection of artifacts for permanent curation, and includes a history of the research on Perry Mesa and a review of the recent competing theories about how it was organized for war or how the landscape became ecologically degraded. The study also provides an analysis of the relevance of these data to understanding the larger interaction spheres of the Central Arizona Tradition, the Verde Confederacy, and the Hopi macroeconomy.
Category: Social Science