DRIFT THE UNMOORING OF AMERICAN MILITARY POWER

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Drift

Author : Rachel Maddow
ISBN : 9780307460981
Genre : History
File Size : 82.56 MB
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Identifying what the author believes to be a battle between the priorities of civilian life and the war, the host of the critically acclaimed The Rachel Maddow Show explains that today's focus on national security is actually compromising national stability, tracing the historical events and contributing factors that have promoted a deeply militarized American culture.
Category: History

Drift

Author : Rachel Maddow
ISBN : 9780307461001
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 48.20 MB
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The #1 New York Times bestseller that charts America’s dangerous drift into a state of perpetual war. Written with bracing wit and intelligence, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that we've drifted away from America's original ideals and become a nation weirdly at peace with perpetual war. To understand how we've arrived at such a dangerous place, Maddow takes us from the Vietnam War to today's war in Afghanistan, along the way exploring Reagan's radical presidency, the disturbing rise of executive authority, the gradual outsourcing of our war-making capabilities to private companies, the plummeting percentage of American families whose children fight our constant wars for us, and even the changing fortunes of G.I. Joe. Ultimately, she shows us just how much we stand to lose by allowing the scope of American military power to overpower our political discourse. Sensible yet provocative, dead serious yet seri­ously funny, Drift will reinvigorate a "loud and jangly" political debate about our vast and confounding national security state.
Category: Political Science

Drift

Author : Rachel Maddow
ISBN : 9781921942693
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 55.68 MB
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When Thomas Jefferson spoke of ‘never keeping an unnecessary soldier’, neither he nor America’s other founding fathers could have envisaged the national security state that the country has become. They could not have imagined its tens of thousands of ‘privateers’; its bloated Department of Homeland Security; its rusting nuclear weapons, ill-maintained and difficult to dismantle; and its strange fascination with an unproven counterinsurgency doctrine. Written with bracing wit and intelligence, Rachel Maddow’s Drift argues that America has drifted away from its original ideals and become a nation weirdly at peace with perpetual war, with all the financial and human costs that entails. Maddow takes us from the Vietnam War to today’s war in Afghanistan, exploring the disturbing rise of executive authority, the gradual outsourcing of war-making capabilities to private companies, the plummeting percentage of American soldiers in the military, and even the changing fortunes of GI Joe. Ultimately, she shows us just how much we all stand to lose by allowing the priorities of the national security state to overpower political discourse. Sensible yet provocative, deadly serious yet seriously funny, Drift has already reinvigorated a political debate about how, when, and where America’s strength and power should be applied — and who gets to make those decisions.
Category: Political Science

Twilight Of The Elites

Author : Christopher Hayes
ISBN : 9780307720467
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 82.89 MB
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Analyzes scandals in high-profile institutions, from Wall Street and the Catholic Church to corporate America and Major League Baseball, while evaluating how an elite American meritocracy rose throughout the past half-century before succumbing to unprecedented levels of corruption and failure. 75,000 first printing.
Category: Business & Economics

War Time

Author : Mary L. Dudziak
ISBN : 9780199775231
Genre : History
File Size : 20.36 MB
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Since the early twentieth century, America has almost constantly been engaged in some form of overseas armed conflict. Dudziak argues that policy makers and the American public nevertheless continue to view wars as temporary events that eventually give way to normal peace times. This tendency has troubling consequences for our legal system and our rights as citizens. This inventive and thoughtful analysis advocates a new paradigm that acknowledges war's role as an ongoing feature of American law and democracy.
Category: History

Breach Of Trust

Author : Andrew J. Bacevich
ISBN : 9780805096033
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 54.60 MB
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A blistering critique of the gulf between America's soldiers and the society that sends them off to war, from the bestselling author of The Limits of Power and Washington Rules The United States has been "at war" in Iraq and Afghanistan for more than a decade. Yet as war has become normalized, a yawning gap has opened between America's soldiers and veterans and the society in whose name they fight. For ordinary citizens, as former secretary of defense Robert Gates has acknowledged, armed conflict has become an "abstraction" and military service "something for other people to do." In Breach of Trust, bestselling author Andrew J. Bacevich takes stock of the separation between Americans and their military, tracing its origins to the Vietnam era and exploring its pernicious implications: a nation with an abiding appetite for war waged at enormous expense by a standing army demonstrably unable to achieve victory. Among the collateral casualties are values once considered central to democratic practice, including the principle that responsibility for defending the country should rest with its citizens. Citing figures as diverse as the martyr-theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the marine-turned-anti-warrior Smedley Butler, Breach of Trust summons Americans to restore that principle. Rather than something for "other people" to do, national defense should become the business of "we the people." Should Americans refuse to shoulder this responsibility, Bacevich warns, the prospect of endless war, waged by a "foreign legion" of professionals and contractor-mercenaries, beckons. So too does bankruptcy—moral as well as fiscal.
Category: Political Science

The Defence Of Duffer S Drift

Author : Ernest Dunlop Swinton
ISBN : UCAL:$B261643
Genre : Guerrilla warfare
File Size : 67.99 MB
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Category: Guerrilla warfare

The Orchardist

Author : Amanda Coplin
ISBN : 9780062188526
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 31.90 MB
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At once intimate and epic, The Orchardist is historical fiction at its best, in the grand literary tradition of William Faulkner, Marilynne Robinson, Michael Ondaatje, Annie Proulx, and Toni Morrison. In her stunningly original and haunting debut novel, Amanda Coplin evokes a powerful sense of place, mixing tenderness and violence as she spins an engrossing tale of a solitary orchardist who provides shelter to two runaway teenage girls in the untamed American West, and the dramatic consequences of his actions.
Category: Fiction

American Nuremberg

Author : Rebecca Gordon
ISBN : 9781510703384
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 74.49 MB
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No subject is more hotly debated than the extreme measures that our government has taken after 9/11 in the name of national security. Torture, extraordinary rendition, drone assassinations, secret detention centers (or “black sites”), massive surveillance of citizens. But while the press occasionally exposes the dark side of the war on terror and congressional investigators sometimes raise alarms about the abuses committed by U.S. intelligence agencies and armed forces, no high U.S. official has been prosecuted for these violations – which many legal observers around the world consider war crimes. The United States helped establish the international principles guiding the prosecution of war crimes – starting with the Nuremberg tribunal following World War II, when Nazi officials were held accountable for their crimes against humanity. But the American government and legal system have consistently refused to apply these same principles to our own officials. Now Rebecca Gordon takes on the explosive task of “indicting” the officials who – in a just society – should be put on trial for war crimes. Some might dismiss this as a symbolic exercise. But what is at stake here is the very soul of the nation.
Category: Political Science

America S Constitution

Author : Akhil Reed Amar
ISBN : 9781588364876
Genre : History
File Size : 55.29 MB
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In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it. We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding “We the People,” was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators’ inspired genius. Despite the Constitution’s flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America’s Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution that is unamendable; the reason America adopted an electoral college; why a president must be at least thirty-five years old; and why–for now, at least–only those citizens who were born under the American flag can become president. From his unique perspective, Amar also gives us unconventional wisdom about the Constitution and its significance throughout the nation’s history. For one thing, we see that the Constitution has been far more democratic than is conventionally understood. Even though the document was drafted by white landholders, a remarkably large number of citizens (by the standards of 1787) were allowed to vote up or down on it, and the document’s later amendments eventually extended the vote to virtually all Americans. We also learn that the Founders’ Constitution was far more slavocratic than many would acknowledge: the “three fifths” clause gave the South extra political clout for every slave it owned or acquired. As a result, slaveholding Virginians held the presidency all but four of the Republic’s first thirty-six years, and proslavery forces eventually came to dominate much of the federal government prior to Lincoln’s election. Ambitious, even-handed, eminently accessible, and often surprising, America’s Constitution is an indispensable work, bound to become a standard reference for any student of history and all citizens of the United States.
Category: History