BLACK AMERICAN MONEY 2

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Black American Money 2

Author : Boyce Watkins
ISBN : 1544111711
Genre :
File Size : 34.35 MB
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One of the greatest challenges for the African American community is a severe lack of power. Like caged animals in the zoo, millions of black people in America and across the world often feel that our lives are controlled by other people or that opportunities only enter our lives when they are created by our oppressors. This debilitating mindset can lead to hopelessness, depression and decision-making that is driven by fear rather than desire. Instead of believing that we possess the ability to improve our lives, we simply wait and hope that White Americans will one day have a change of heart. Black American Money is written to kill the victim mentality and help us to see the world for what it really is. There is no power for the victim, the beggar, or the one who simply prays, hopes and waits for their oppressor to give them what they need. According to Finance PhD and noted scholar Dr Boyce Watkins, the world is never going to be nicer to black people and whites are never going to give us enough opportunity to sustain the masses. Instead, they will only volunteer enough crumbs to keep us under control and offer superficial congratulations for meaningless accomplishments within the pre-approved context of white supremacist institutions. It is only through proactive positioning, extensive preparation and institution building that black people can ever have any true power in America and beyond. Through a series of compelling essays and thought-provoking analysis, Dr Watkins hits the nail on the head in ways that only he can do. This book will shape your thinking, rivet your mindset and lead you to a whole new way of seeing racial inequality in America and beyond. This book will make you a champion.
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Black American Money

Author : Boyce D. Watkins
ISBN : 0974263281
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 27.66 MB
Format : PDF
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Category: Business & Economics

White Money Black Power

Author : Noliwe M. Rooks
ISBN : 0807032719
Genre : Education
File Size : 67.66 MB
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White Money/Black Power is a Beacon Press publication.
Category: Education

Black Film White Money

Author : Jesse Algeron Rhines
ISBN : 0813522676
Genre : Performing Arts
File Size : 65.29 MB
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Looks at the history of Black filmmakers, and shows how the motion picture industry controls and influences Black films
Category: Performing Arts

Dark Money

Author : Jane Mayer
ISBN : 9780307947901
Genre : History
File Size : 52.17 MB
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Why is America living in an age of profound economic inequality? Why, despite the desperate need to address climate change, have even modest environmental efforts been defeated again and again? Why have protections for employees been decimated? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers? --Publisher.
Category: History

Hidden Figures

Author : Margot Lee Shetterly
ISBN : 9780062363619
Genre : History
File Size : 67.6 MB
Format : PDF
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The #1 New York Times bestseller The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.
Category: History

The Color Of Money

Author : Mehrsa Baradaran
ISBN : 9780674982307
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 48.59 MB
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In 1863 black communities owned less than 1 percent of total U.S. wealth. Today that number has barely budged. Mehrsa Baradaran pursues this wealth gap by focusing on black banks. She challenges the myth that black banking is the solution to the racial wealth gap and argues that black communities can never accumulate wealth in a segregated economy.
Category: Business & Economics

The Color Of Law A Forgotten History Of How Our Government Segregated America

Author : Richard Rothstein
ISBN : 9781631492860
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 49.69 MB
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"Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation." —William Julius Wilson In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation—that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation—the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north. As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. “The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book” (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothstein’s invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.
Category: Social Science

Black Boy

Author : Richard Wright
ISBN : 0061935484
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 77.40 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Richard Wright grew up in the woods of Mississippi, with poverty, hunger, fear, and hatred. He lied, stole, and raged at those around him; at six he was a "drunkard," hanging about taverns. Surly, brutal, cold, suspicious, and self-pitying, he was surrounded on one side by whites who were either indifferent to him, pitying, or cruel, and on the other by blacks who resented anyone trying to rise above the common lot. Black Boy is Richard Wright's powerful account of his journey from innocence to experience in the Jim Crow South. It is at once an unashamed confession and a profound indictment—a poignant and disturbing record of social injustice and human suffering.
Category: Fiction