BECOMING MEXICAN AMERICAN ETHNICITY CULTURE AND IDENTITY IN CHICANO LOS ANGELES 1900 1945

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Becoming Mexican American

Author : George J. Sanchez
ISBN : 0195096487
Genre : History
File Size : 31.82 MB
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Twentieth century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between distinct cultures in U.S. history. In this pioneering study, Sanchez explores how Mexican immigrants "Americanized" themselves in order to fit in, thereby losing part of their own culture.
Category: History

Whitewashed Adobe

Author : William Deverell
ISBN : 9780520932531
Genre : History
File Size : 80.28 MB
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Chronicling the rise of Los Angeles through shifting ideas of race and ethnicity, William Deverell offers a unique perspective on how the city grew and changed. Whitewashed Adobe considers six different developments in the history of the city—including the cementing of the Los Angeles River, the outbreak of bubonic plague in 1924, and the evolution of America's largest brickyard in the 1920s. In an absorbing narrative supported by a number of previously unpublished period photographs, Deverell shows how a city that was once part of Mexico itself came of age through appropriating—and even obliterating—the region's connections to Mexican places and people. Deverell portrays Los Angeles during the 1850s as a city seething with racial enmity due to the recent war with Mexico. He explains how, within a generation, the city's business interests, looking for a commercially viable way to establish urban identity, borrowed Mexican cultural traditions and put on a carnival called La Fiesta de Los Angeles. He analyzes the subtle ways in which ethnicity came to bear on efforts to corral the unpredictable Los Angeles River and shows how the resident Mexican population was put to work fashioning the modern metropolis. He discusses how Los Angeles responded to the nation's last major outbreak of bubonic plague and concludes by considering the Mission Play, a famed drama tied to regional assumptions about history, progress, and ethnicity. Taking all of these elements into consideration, Whitewashed Adobe uncovers an urban identity—and the power structure that fostered it—with far-reaching implications for contemporary Los Angeles.
Category: History

En Aquel Entonces

Author : Manuel G. Gonzales
ISBN : 0253337658
Genre : History
File Size : 38.23 MB
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En Aquel Entonces [In Those Days] Readings in Mexican-American History Edited by Manuel G. Gonzales and Cynthia M. Gonzales An interdisciplinary anthology covering diverse aspects of the Mexican-American experience in the United States. The advent of Chicano Studies in the 1960s spawned a tremendous interest in the history of Mexicans in the United States. Committed to a multidisciplinary approach from the very outset, Chicano and Chicana scholars used a variety of perspectives to explain the Mexican-American past, but much of this work has not been readily available to students. En Aquel Entonces is intended as a partial solution to the problem, an anthology that brings together 31 of the most innovative journal articles published during the past four decades. These articles, representing several disciplines, provide students of history with a panoramic portrait of Mexicanos in the United States while at the same time introducing them to Chicana/o historiography. Each of the essays has been carefully edited in consultation with its author to present a text that is more accessible to students and general readers Manuel G. Gonzales is Professor of History at Diablo Valley College and author of Andrea Costa and the Rise of Socialism in the Romagna, The Hispanic Elite of the Southwest, and Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States (Indiana University Press). Cynthia M. Gonzales is an Education Specialist at Ygnacio Learning Center in Walnut Creek, California and was Director of Education at Walnut Creek Hospital from 1985–1998. Contents Introduction by Manuel G. Gonzales I. Genesis of a People: Before 1848 Presidarias y Pobladoras: The Journey North and Life in Frontier California, Antonia I. Castaneda Honor Ideology, Marriage Negotiation, and Class-Gender Domination in New Mexico, 1690-1846, Ramon A. Gutierrez Gnats, Goods, and Greasers: Mexican Merchants on the Santa Fe Trail, David A. Sandoval Rancho Life in Alta California, Federico A. Sanchez Discovering the Tejano Community in "Early" Texas, Jesus F. de la Teja The Origins of Anti-Mexican Sentiment in the United States, Raymund A. Paredes II. Gringos versus Greasers: 1848–1900 In Re Ricardo Rodriguez: An Attempt at Chicano Disfranchisement in San Antonio, 1896–1897, Arnoldo De Leon Mexican-American Land Grant Adjudication, Armando C. Alonzo The Barrioization of Nineteenth-Century Mexican Californians: From Landowners to Laborers, Antonio Rios-Bustamante Tucsonenses and Angelenos: A Socio-Economic Study of Two Mexican-American Barrios, 1860–1880, Richard Griswold del Castillo Mexican American Catholicism in the Southwest: The Transformation of a Popular Religion, Alberto L. Pulido Carlos I. Velasco and the Defense of Mexican Rights in Territorial Arizona, Manuel G. Gonzales III. The Great Migration: 1900–1940 Chicanos in Chicago: A Brief History, Louise Ano Nuevo Kerr Settlers, Sojourners, and Proletarians: Social Formation in the Great Plains Sugar Beets Industry, 1890–1940, Dennis Nodin Valdes The Urbanization of Southwestern Chicanos in the Early 20th Century, Ricardo Romo Regionalism, Politics, and Gender in Southwest History: The League of United Latin American Citizens' Expansion into New Mexico from Texas, 1929–1945, Cynthia E. Orozco Labor Threat and Industrialized Agriculture in California: The Case of the 1933 San Joaquin Valley Cotton Strike, Ramon D. Chacon Women, Work, and Community in the Mexican Colonias of the Southern California Citrus Belt, Gilbert G. Gonzalez Texas Newspapers and Chicana Workers' Activism, 1919–1974, Irene Ledesma IV. The Rise of the Middle Class: 1940–1965 Braceros in the Pacific Northwest: Laborers on the Domestic Front, 1942–1947, Erasmo Gamboa Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II, Christine Marin A Promise Fulfilled: Mexican Cannery Workers
Category: History

East Los Angeles

Author : Ricardo Romo
ISBN : 0292720416
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 83.1 MB
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This is the story of the largest Mexican-American community in the United States, the city within a city known as "East Los Angeles." How did this barrio of over one million men and women—occupying an area greater than Manhattan or Washington D.C.—come to be? Although promoted early in this century as a workers' paradise, Los Angeles fared poorly in attracting European immigrants and American blue-collar workers. Wages were low, and these workers were understandably reluctant to come to a city which was also troubled by labor strife. Mexicans made up the difference, arriving in the city in massive numbers. Who these Mexicans were and the conditions that caused them to leave their own country are revealed in East Los Angeles. The author examines how they adjusted to life in one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States, how they fared in this country's labor market, and the problems of segregation and prejudice they confronted. Ricardo Romo is associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin.
Category: Social Science

Studyguide For Becoming Mexican American

Author : Sanchez
ISBN : 142882118X
Genre : Education
File Size : 63.14 MB
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Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Virtually all of the testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events from the textbook are included. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides give all of the outlines, highlights, notes, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Only Cram101 is Textbook Specific. Accompanys: 9780195096484 .
Category: Education

Walls And Mirrors

Author : David G. Gutiérrez
ISBN : 0520916867
Genre : History
File Size : 44.65 MB
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Covering more than one hundred years of American history, Walls and Mirrors examines the ways that continuous immigration from Mexico transformed—and continues to shape—the political, social, and cultural life of the American Southwest. Taking a fresh approach to one of the most divisive political issues of our time, David Gutiérrez explores the ways that nearly a century of steady immigration from Mexico has shaped ethnic politics in California and Texas, the two largest U.S. border states. Drawing on an extensive body of primary and secondary sources, Gutiérrez focuses on the complex ways that their pattern of immigration influenced Mexican Americans' sense of social and cultural identity—and, as a consequence, their politics. He challenges the most cherished American myths about U.S. immigration policy, pointing out that, contrary to rhetoric about "alien invasions," U.S. government and regional business interests have actively recruited Mexican and other foreign workers for over a century, thus helping to establish and perpetuate the flow of immigrants into the United States. In addition, Gutiérrez offers a new interpretation of the debate over assimilation and multiculturalism in American society. Rejecting the notion of the melting pot, he explores the ways that ethnic Mexicans have resisted assimilation and fought to create a cultural space for themselves in distinctive ethnic communities throughout the southwestern United States.
Category: History

Migra

Author : Kelly Lytle Hernandez
ISBN : 9780520257696
Genre : History
File Size : 50.52 MB
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Reveals the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. This book focuses on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringsto light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics.--[source unknown].
Category: History

Mean Streets

Author : Andrew J. Diamond
ISBN : 9780520257474
Genre : History
File Size : 35.7 MB
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"In a city that social scientists feel we know well, Mean Streets provides new and exciting insights into the spatial dimensions of urban life. Not afraid to talk about both attraction and repulsion, Diamond provocatively unearths the critical role of youths—ages 15 to 25—in leading their wider communities in the negotiation of race."—George Sanchez, author of Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles 1900-1945 "In Mean Streets, Andrew Diamond brilliantly bridges social, political, and cultural history. His deeply researched account of Chicago's black, white, and Latino youth subcultures offers a fresh perspective on the entangled histories of identity, power, and place. This is a first-rate book."—Thomas J. Sugrue, author of Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North. "This excellent social history of Chicago's youth gangs not only demonstrates their centrality to the vaunted community and turf consciousness of the city's neighborhoods; it also explains the widespread ethnic and racial conflict that has characterized the city for most of the twentieth century. Diamond accomplishes this with a remarkable amount of empirical research on the gritty streets, playgrounds and parks, dance halls, 'can houses' (brothels), and industrial wastelands in, between, and around these neighborhoods."—James R. Barrett, author of Work and Community in 'The Jungle': Chicago's Packing House Workers, 1894-1922.
Category: History

Desert Immigrants

Author : Mario T. García
ISBN : 0300028830
Genre : History
File Size : 66.58 MB
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Discusses how the Mexican immigrants and their descendants have contributed to America's past, present, and future.
Category: History

Unspeakable Violence

Author : Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández
ISBN : 0822350572
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77.5 MB
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Unspeakable Violence addresses the epistemic and physical violence inflicted on racialized and gendered subjects in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands from the mid-nineteenth century through the early twentieth. Arguing that this violence was fundamental to U.S., Mexican, and Chicana/o nationalisms, Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández examines the lynching of a Mexican woman in California in 1851, the Camp Grant Indian Massacre of 1871, the racism evident in the work of the anthropologist Jovita González, and the attempted genocide, between 1876 and 1907, of the Yaqui Indians in the Arizona–Sonora borderlands. Guidotti-Hernández shows that these events have been told and retold in ways that have produced particular versions of nationhood and effaced other issues. Scrutinizing stories of victimization and resistance, and celebratory narratives of mestizaje and hybridity in Chicana/o, Latina/o, and borderlands studies, she contends that by not acknowledging the racialized violence perpetrated by Mexicans, Chicanas/os, and indigenous peoples, as well as Anglos, narratives of mestizaje and resistance inadvertently privilege certain brown bodies over others. Unspeakable Violence calls for a new, transnational feminist approach to violence, gender, sexuality, race, and citizenship in the borderlands.
Category: Social Science