BAD INDIANS A TRIBAL MEMOIR

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Bad Indians

Author : Deborah A. Miranda
ISBN : 1597142018
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 68.9 MB
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This book leads readers through a troubled past using the authors family circle as a touch point and resource for discovery of much more. Personal and strong, these stories present an evocative new view of the shaping of California. and the role of the Mission period in the lives of all California Indians. The result is a work of literary art that is wise, angry, and playful all at once
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Bad Indians

Author : Deborah A. Miranda
ISBN : 1597142018
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 71.63 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 187
Read : 1059

This book leads readers through a troubled past using the authors family circle as a touch point and resource for discovery of much more. Personal and strong, these stories present an evocative new view of the shaping of California. and the role of the Mission period in the lives of all California Indians. The result is a work of literary art that is wise, angry, and playful all at once
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Indian Cartography

Author : Deborah A. Miranda
ISBN : 0912678992
Genre : Poetry
File Size : 76.21 MB
Format : PDF
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Read : 248

Poetry. Native American Studies. Winner of the North American Native Authors First Book Award. Deborah Miranda's INDIAN CARTOGRAPHY provides a psychic and emotional remapping of the Native American world of the West Coast. In lyric verse that is sometimes spare, sometimes dramatic, Miranda charts a homeward journey through the heart's territory --a land that has long been torn, disrupted, and colonized in the harshest sense of that word --Janice Gould. The first poem grabbed my wrist and held me for the duration. The prose is equally alive and its images have the precision and the edge of the finest poetry. Seamless back and forth journey from one little girl to another, one woman to another, one memory to another. All distinct yet connected. One long scream from a heart who will not stop living, whose life is an affirmation of survival --Wendy Rose. Miranda's poetry and essays have appeared in Bricolage, Calyx, Calloo, The Cimarron Review, Raven Chronicles, and Soujourner.
Category: Poetry

Books And Islands In Ojibwe Country

Author : Louise Erdrich
ISBN : 0792253736
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 36.41 MB
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The critically acclaimed author of Love Medicine describes her evocative odyssey back to the islands of her ancestors in southern Ontario, offering a compelling portrait of Ojibwe language, culture, spirits, traditions, and art as she visits centuries-old rock paintings and recalls her own family and contemporary life. Reprint.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Tribal Secrets

Author : Robert Allen Warrior
ISBN : 0816623791
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 70.75 MB
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A framework for understanding the contributions of Vine Deloria Jr. and John Joseph Mathews, two American Indian Intellectuals, as part of the struggle for tribal sovereighty, and argues that the contemporary reality of Native people can and should be part of the past, present, and future of Indian America.
Category: Social Science

A Global History Of Indigenous Peoples

Author : K. Coates
ISBN : 9780230509078
Genre : History
File Size : 24.33 MB
Format : PDF
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A Global History of Indigenous Peoples examines the history of the indigenous/tribal peoples of the world. The work spans the period from the pivotal migrations which saw the peopling of the world, examines the processes by which tribal peoples established themselves as separate from surplus-based and more material societies, and considers the impact of the policies of domination and colonization which brought dramatic change to indigenous cultures. The book covers both tribal societies affected by the expansion of European empires and those indigenous cultures influenced by the economic and military expansion of non-European powers. The work concludes with a discussion of contemporary political and legal conflicts between tribal peoples and nation-states and the on-going effort to sustain indigenous cultures in the face of globalization, resource developments and continued threats to tribal lands and societies.
Category: History

Viola Martinez California Paiute

Author : Diana Meyers Bahr
ISBN : 9780806179599
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 80.61 MB
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The life story of Viola Martinez, an Owens Valley Paiute Indian of eastern California, extends over nine decades of the twentieth century. Viola experienced forced assimilation in an Indian boarding school, overcame racial stereotypes to pursue a college degree, and spent several years working at a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. Finding herself poised uncertainly between Indian and white worlds, Viola was determined to turn her marginalized existence into an opportunity for personal empowerment. In Viola Martinez, California Paiute, Diana Meyers Bahr recounts Viola’s extraordinary life story and examines her strategies for dealing with acculturation. Bahr allows Viola to tell her story in her own words, beginning with her early years in Owens Valley, where she learned traditional lifeways, such as gathering piñons, from her aunt. In the summers, she traveled by horse and buggy into the High Sierras where her aunt traded with Basque sheepherders. Viola was sent to the Sherman Institute, a federal boarding school with a mandate to assimilate American Indians into U.S. mainstream culture. Punished for speaking Paiute at the boarding school, Viola and her cousin climbed fifty-foot palm trees to speak their native language secretly. Realizing that, despite her efforts, she was losing her language, Viola resolved not just to learn English but to master it. She earned a degree from Santa Barbara State College and pursued a career as social worker. During World War II, Viola worked as an employment counselor for Japanese American internees at the Manzanar War Relocation Authority camp. Later in life, she became a teacher and worked tirelessly as a founding member of the Los Angeles American Indian Education Commission.
Category: Social Science

Abalone Tales

Author : Les Field
ISBN : 9780822391159
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 42.5 MB
Format : PDF
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For Native peoples of California, the abalone found along the state’s coast have remarkably complex significance as food, spirit, narrative symbol, tradable commodity, and material with which to make adornment and sacred regalia. The large mollusks also represent contemporary struggles surrounding cultural identity and political sovereignty. Abalone Tales, a collaborative ethnography, presents different perspectives on the multifaceted material and symbolic relationships between abalone and the Ohlone, Pomo, Karuk, Hupa, and Wiyot peoples of California. The research agenda, analyses, and writing strategies were determined through collaborative relationships between the anthropologist Les W. Field and Native individuals and communities. Several of these individuals contributed written texts or oral stories for inclusion in the book. Tales about abalone and their historical and contemporary meanings are related by Field and his coauthors, who include the chair and other members of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe; a Point Arena Pomo elder; the chair of the Wiyot tribe and her sister; several Hupa Indians; and a Karuk scholar, artist, and performer. Reflecting the divergent perspectives of various Native groups and people, the stories and analyses belie any presumption of a single, unified indigenous understanding of abalone. At the same time, they shed light on abalone’s role in cultural revitalization, struggles over territory, tribal appeals for federal recognition, and connections among California’s Native groups. While California’s abalone are in danger of extinction, their symbolic power appears to surpass even the environmental crises affecting the state’s vulnerable coastline.
Category: Social Science

Yakama Rising

Author : Michelle M. Jacob
ISBN : 9780816599219
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 28.89 MB
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The Yakama Nation of present-day Washington State has responded to more than a century of historical trauma with a resurgence of grassroots activism and cultural revitalization. This pathbreaking ethnography shifts the conversation from one of victimhood to one of ongoing resistance and resilience as a means of healing the soul wounds of settler colonialism. Yakama Rising: Indigenous Cultural Revitalization, Activism, and Healing argues that Indigenous communities themselves have the answers to the persistent social problems they face. This book contributes to discourses of Indigenous social change by articulating a Yakama decolonizing praxis that advances the premise that grassroots activism and cultural revitalization are powerful examples of decolonization. Michelle M. Jacob employs ethnographic case studies to demonstrate the tension between reclaiming traditional cultural practices and adapting to change. Through interviewees’ narratives, she carefully tacks back and forth between the atrocities of colonization and the remarkable actions of individuals committed to sustaining Yakama heritage. Focusing on three domains of Indigenous revitalization—dance, language, and foods—Jacob carefully elucidates the philosophy underlying and unifying each domain while also illustrating the importance of these practices for Indigenous self-determination, healing, and survival. In the impassioned voice of a member of the Yakama Nation, Jacob presents a volume that is at once intimate and specific to her home community and that also advances theories of Indigenous decolonization, feminism, and cultural revitalization. Jacob’s theoretical and methodological contributions make this work valuable to a range of students, academics, tribal community members, and professionals, and an essential read for anyone interested in the ways that grassroots activism can transform individual lives, communities, and society.
Category: Social Science

The Zen Of La Llorona

Author : Deborah A. Miranda
ISBN : 1844710637
Genre : Poetry
File Size : 47.20 MB
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The Zen of La Llorona is a second collection of poetry by a Native American woman, and as such, it goes beyond initial concerns with personal racial identity. While still very much speaking from an indigenous point of view, The Zen of La Llorona complicates that indigenous identity with visceral explorations of gendered violence, sexual orientation and mothering in an unpredictable, chaotic world. Key to these poems are historical and current events: traumas as distant as the colonization of California’s indigenous peoples and as close as the destructive forces of 9/11 and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. How do we survive destruction without becoming destroyers ourselves? How can the elements of earth, love, community and work nurture creation, and manifest hope? Utilizing the figure of “La Llorona,” a mythical indigenous figure of the Americas who first murders and then mourns her children, the poems in this book seek to unravel the mysterious fascination we have with despair, and move us along with the poet to a more clarifying, centering focus on joy. Zen, the author notes, tells us “everyone loses everything,” leaving us with only a decision about our attitude toward loss itself. La Llorona, on the other hand, says, “Nonsense – there’s always something left to lose.” What that “something” is, and how we can preserve and honor it, is at the heart of this collection of poems.
Category: Poetry