ALONG A RIVER THE FIRST FRENCH CANADIAN WOMEN

Download Along A River The First French Canadian Women ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to ALONG A RIVER THE FIRST FRENCH CANADIAN WOMEN book pdf for free now.

Along A River

Author : Jan Noel
ISBN : 9781442698260
Genre : History
File Size : 45.68 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 149
Read : 1206

French-Canadian explorers, traders, and soldiers feature prominently in this country's storytelling, but little has been written about their female counterparts. In Along a River, award-winning historian Jan Noel shines a light on the lives of remarkable French-Canadian women — immigrant brides, nuns, tradeswomen, farmers, governors' wives, and even smugglers — during the period between the settlement of the St. Lawrence Lowlands and the Victorian era. Along a River builds the case that inside the cabins that stretched for miles along the shoreline, most early French-Canadian women retained old fashioned forms of economic production and customary rights over land ownership. Noel demonstrates how this continued even as the world changed around them by comparing their lives to those of their contemporaries in France, England, and New England.Exploring how the daughters and granddaughters of the filles du roi adapted to their terrain, turned their hands to trade, and even acquired surprising influence at the French court, Along a River is an innovative and engagingly written history.
Category: History

French Canadians Furs And Indigenous Women In The Making Of The Pacific Northwest

Author : Jean Barman
ISBN : 9780774828079
Genre : History
File Size : 78.61 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 261
Read : 1065

Jean Barman rewrites the history of the Pacific Northwest from the perspective of the French Canadians involved in the fur economy, the Indigenous women whose presence in their lives encouraged them to stay, and their descendants. For half a century, French Canadians were the region’s largest group of newcomers, facilitating early overland crossings, driving the fur economy, initiating non-wholly-Indigenous agricultural settlement, and easing relations with Indigenous peoples. When the region was divided in 1846, they also ensured that the northern half would go to Britain, ultimately giving Canada its Pacific shoreline.
Category: History

Helene S World

Author : Susan McNelley
ISBN : 0615738591
Genre : Québec (Québec)
File Size : 20.59 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 395
Read : 428

Hélène Desportes, born in 1620, was the first child of French parents to be born in Quebec and to survive. For nine years, she lived in Samuel de Champlain's Habitation. In 1629, the little settlement was captured by the English. Hélène, along with the majority of the other French settlers, was put on an English ship and taken to France. She returned to Quebec in 1634 and spent the remainder of her life in the little colony. She was married twice, had fifteen children, and seventy grandchildren. No portrait of Hélène exits. There are no memoirs, no diaries, nor any letters to guide the biographer. Nevertheless, there are public records and other primary sources from which we are able to piece together her life. This, then, is her remarkable story, set against the backdrop of France's efforts to establish a colony in the New World along the banks of the St. Lawrence River.
Category: Québec (Québec)

The Canadian Frontier 1534 1760

Author : William John Eccles
ISBN : 082630706X
Genre : History
File Size : 71.52 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 720
Read : 624

This account of the French era in Canada is the most original treatment of the subject in over a century. The analysis and ideas in the first edition helped create a whole new school of thought about Canadian history. Over 50,000 copies have been used in classrooms in Canada and the United States in the decade since its publication. In this revised edition, the author updates the bibliography and adds new ideas advanced in the 1970s that will make more valuable still this acclaimed general history of New France.
Category: History

Bride Of New France A Novel

Author : Suzanne Desrochers
ISBN : 9780393073379
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 27.74 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 644
Read : 194

Follows the life of Laure Beasejour, a young French orphan who was transported to the new, but primitive, Canadian colony as part of a program sponsored by King Louis XIV that sent 800 young women abroad to marry settlers. 13,000 first printing.
Category: Fiction

A Tale Of Two Migrations

Author : Patrice DeMers Kaneda
ISBN : 1478713364
Genre : History
File Size : 26.52 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 626
Read : 386

A French Canadian Odyssey...Between 1840 and 1930 millions of people passed through Ellis Island to New York from the countries of Europe, but what do we know of the descendants of the 10,000 original settlers of Nouvelle France, French Canada, who walked, came on horseback, or train and made their way to New England and to a new life during the same period? In this adventurous tale, Pat Demers Kaneda finds her family, real and imagined, in 17th century France and brings them across the sea to North America where they face hardship and unimagined challenges and leaves them in New England in the1950's to face a new decade. If you are one of the descendants of the Quebecois, this is your story. It is one more piece of the American mosaic.
Category: History

Buying A Bride

Author : Marcia A. Zug
ISBN : 9780814771815
Genre : History
File Size : 65.79 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 627
Read : 1294

There have always been mail-order brides in America—but we haven’t always thought about them in the same ways. In Buying a Bride, Marcia A. Zug starts with the so-called “Tobacco Wives” of the Jamestown colony and moves all the way forward to today’s modern same-sex mail-order grooms to explore the advantages and disadvantages of mail-order marriage. It’s a history of deception, physical abuse, and failed unions. It’s also the story of how mail-order marriage can offer women surprising and empowering opportunities. Drawing on a forgotten trove of colorful mail-order marriage court cases, Zug explores the many troubling legal issues that arise in mail-order marriage: domestic abuse and murder, breach of contract, fraud (especially relating to immigration), and human trafficking and prostitution. She tells the story of how mail-order marriage lost the benign reputation it enjoyed in the Civil War era to become more and more reviled over time, and she argues compellingly that it does not entirely deserve its current reputation. While it is a common misperception that women turn to mail-order marriage as a desperate last resort, most mail-order brides are enticed rather than coerced. Since the first mail-order brides arrived on American shores in 1619, mail-order marriage has enabled women to improve both their marital prospects and their legal, political, and social freedoms. Buying A Bride uncovers this history and shows us how mail-order marriage empowers women and should be protected and even encouraged.
Category: History

Fear And The Shaping Of Early American Societies

Author : Lauric Henneton
ISBN : 9789004314740
Genre : History
File Size : 46.30 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 732
Read : 248

Fear and the Shaping of Early American Societies tracks the impact of fear and responses thereto on the social and political construction of 17th- and 18th-century America.
Category: History

Continental Ambitions

Author : Kevin Starr
ISBN : 9781681497365
Genre : History
File Size : 77.99 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 252
Read : 433

Kevin Starr has achieved a fast-paced evocation of three Roman Catholic civilizations—Spain, France, and Recusant England—as they explored, evangelized, and settled the North American continent. This book represents the first time this story has been told in one volume. Showing the same narrative verve of Starr's award-winning Americans and the California Dream series, this riveting—but sometimes painful—history should reach a wide readership. Starr begins this work with the exploration and temporary settlement of North America by recently Christianized Scandinavians. He continues with the destruction of Caribbean peoples by New Spain, the struggle against this tragedy by the great Dominican Bartolomé de Las Casas, the Jesuit and Franciscan exploration and settlement of the Spanish Borderlands (Florida, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Baja, and Alta California), and the strengths and weaknesses of the mission system. He then turns his attention to New France with its highly developed Catholic and Counter-Reformational cultures of Quebec and Montreal, its encounters with Native American peoples, and its advance southward to New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico. The volume ends with the founding of Maryland as a proprietary colony for Roman Catholic Recusants and Anglicans alike, the rise of Philadelphia and southern Pennsylvania as centers of Catholic life, the Suppression of the Jesuits in 1773, and the return of John Carroll to Maryland the following year. Starr dramatizes the representative personalities and events that illustrate the triumphs and the tragedies, the achievements and the failures, of each of these societies in their explorations, treatment of Native Americans, and translations of religious and social value to new and challenging environments. His history is notable for its honesty and its synoptic success in comparing and contrasting three disparate civilizations, albeit each of them Catholic, with three similar and differing approaches to expansion in the New World.
Category: History

The People Of New France

Author : Allan Greer
ISBN : 9781487516826
Genre : History
File Size : 64.21 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 124
Read : 164

This book surveys the social history of New France. For more than a century, until the British conquest of 1759-60, France held sway over a major portion of the North American continent. In this vast territory several unique colonial societies emerged, societies which in many respects mirrored ancien regime France, but which also incorporated a major Aboriginal component. Whereas earlier works in this field presented pre-conquest Canada as completely white and Catholic, The People of New France looks closely at other members of society as well: black slaves, English captives and Christian Iroquois of the mission villages near Montreal. The artisans and soldiers, the merchants, nobles, and priests who congregated in the towns of Montreal and Quebec are the subject of one chapter. Another chapter examines the special situation of French regime women under a legal system that recognized wives as equal owners of all family property. The author extends his analysis to French settlements around the Great Lakes and down the Mississippi Valley, and to Acadia and Ile Royale. Greer's book, addressed to undergraduate students and general readers, provides a deeper understanding of how people lived their lives in these vanished Old-Regime societies.
Category: History