A WORLD OF EMOTIONS ANCIENT GREECE 700 BC 200 AD

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A World Full Of Emotions

Author : Angelos Chaniotis
ISBN : 0981966659
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 25.70 MB
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Emotions penetrate every aspect of our lives. Interwoven with memory, attention, cognition, and decision making, they determine our interpersonal relations, our private life, the public sphere, and religious worship. Emotions had a particular significance also in ancient Greek culture, as Greek intellectuals were the first to theorize emotions in the Western world. A World of Emotions familiarizes the reader with the ubiquitous presence of emotions in Greek culture and life as well as their importance for an understanding of Greek art, literature, history, political life, society, and religion. It reveals how emotions are experienced, expressed, and aroused, how they are controlled or enslave us, how they are manipulated or evaluated. In doing so, it is hoped that this catalogue will trigger thoughts about the importance of emotions in our world, and show why the study of emotions in Classical Antiquity may help us to better understand our contemporary social and cultural environment. The catalogue A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD accompanies a homonymous exhibition displaying a wide array of archeological finds from major museums and institutions in Greece, Europe, and North America. The exhibition is organized by the Onassis Foundation USA.
Category: Architecture

The Emotions Of The Ancient Greeks

Author : David Konstan
ISBN : 9781442691186
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 32.76 MB
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It is generally assumed that whatever else has changed about the human condition since the dawn of civilization, basic human emotions - love, fear, anger, envy, shame - have remained constant. David Konstan, however, argues that the emotions of the ancient Greeks were in some significant respects different from our own, and that recognizing these differences is important to understanding ancient Greek literature and culture. With The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks, Konstan reexamines the traditional assumption that the Greek terms designating the emotions correspond more or less to those of today. Beneath the similarities, there are striking discrepancies. References to Greek 'anger' or 'love' or 'envy,' for example, commonly neglect the fact that the Greeks themselves did not use these terms, but rather words in their own language, such as orgê and philia and phthonos, which do not translate neatly into our modern emotional vocabulary. Konstan argues that classical representations and analyses of the emotions correspond to a world of intense competition for status, and focused on the attitudes, motives, and actions of others rather than on chance or natural events as the elicitors of emotion. Konstan makes use of Greek emotional concepts to interpret various works of classical literature, including epic, drama, history, and oratory. Moreover, he illustrates how the Greeks' conception of emotions has something to tell us about our own views, whether about the nature of particular emotions or of the category of emotion itself.
Category: Literary Criticism

The Berlin Painter And His World

Author : J. Michael Padgett
ISBN : 0300225938
Genre :
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The Berlin Painter was the name given by British classicist and art historian Sir John Beazley to an otherwise anonymous Athenian red-figure vase-painter. The artist's long career extended from about 505 B.C. well into the 460s, and his elegant renderings of daily life and mythological stories offer invaluable insight into the social, political, religious, and artistic workings of early 5th-century Athens. Since the first published identification of the artist in 1911, the Berlin Painter's oeuvre has grown to some 330 works, both complete pots and fragments, making him one of the best-known artists of his kind. This lavishly illustrated publication features nine essays by leading scholars who explore the artist's work, milieu, influence, and legacy, as well as the role of connoisseurship in art-historical scholarship. With an updated catalogue raisonn� that includes many newly attributed works, it is the definitive book on this seminal artist.
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From Alexander To Hadrian

Author : Angelos Chaniotis
ISBN : 0674659643
Genre : History
File Size : 47.40 MB
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The world that Alexander remade in his lifetime was transformed once again by his death in 323 BCE. Over time, trade and intellectual achievement resumed, but Cleopatra's death in 30 BCE brought this Hellenistic moment to a close--or so the story goes. Angelos Chaniotis reveals a Hellenistic world that continued to Hadrian's death in 138 CE.
Category: History

Ancient Greece

Author : Thomas R. Martin
ISBN : 9780300190632
Genre : History
File Size : 53.27 MB
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DIVIn this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. Now in its second edition, this classic work now features new maps and illustrations, a new introduction, and updates throughout./divDIV /divDIV“A limpidly written, highly accessible, and comprehensive history of Greece and its civilizations from prehistory through the collapse of Alexander the Great’s empire. . . . A highly readable account of ancient Greece, particularly useful as an introductory or review text for the student or the general reader.�—Kirkus Reviews/divDIV /divDIV“A polished and informative work that will be useful for general readers and students.�—Daniel Tompkins, Temple University/divDIV/div
Category: History

Gods And Mortals At Mount Olympus

Author : Dimitrios Pandermalis
ISBN : 0990614220
Genre :
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Edited by Dimitrios Pandermalis Essays by Katerina Boli, Angelos Chaniotis, Fritz Graf, Maria Katsakiori, Sophia Kremydi, Richard P. Martin, Dimitrios Pandermalis, and Semeli Pingiatoglou. Located on the eastern slopes of Mount Olympus and atop the bubbling source of the ancient river Baphyras, the city of Dion and its natural environment were interpreted by the ancient Greeks as divine. Dion's proximity to the gods was reflected in the cults and daily existence of local residents but also prompted the area's critical role in establishing the identity of the royal house of Philip and Alexander the Great. With Zeus Olympus as their principal deity, generations of royalty and their followers celebrated their dedication to the god with sanctuaries, festivals, temples, statues, and public buildings, transforming the city into a central sacred site and a monumental urban center. The exhibition presents highlights of the finds of the last fifty years of archaeological excavations and is organized by the Onassis Foundation (USA) and the Dion Excavations, in collaboration with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports--Ephorate of Antiquities of Pieria.
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Korea S Place In The Sun A Modern History Updated

Author : Bruce Cumings
ISBN : 9780393347531
Genre : History
File Size : 23.78 MB
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"Passionate, cantankerous, and fascinating. Rather like Korea itself."--Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times Book Review Korea has endured a "fractured, shattered twentieth century," and this updated edition brings Bruce Cumings's leading history of the modern era into the present. The small country, overshadowed in the imperial era, crammed against great powers during the Cold War, and divided and decimated by the Korean War, has recently seen the first real hints of reunification. But positive movements forward are tempered by frustrating steps backward. In the late 1990s South Korea survived its most severe economic crisis since the Korean War, forcing a successful restructuring of its political economy. Suffering through floods, droughts, and a famine that cost the lives of millions of people, North Korea has been labeled part of an "axis of evil" by the George W. Bush administration and has renewed its nuclear threats. On both sides Korea seems poised to continue its fractured existence on into the new century, with potential ramifications for the rest of the world.
Category: History

Marsden Hartley S Maine

Author : Donna M. Cassidy
ISBN : 9781588396136
Genre : Art
File Size : 71.58 MB
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Marsden Hartley had a lifelong personal and aesthetic engagement with Maine, where he was born in 1877 and where he died at age sixty-six. As an important member of the artistic circle promoted by Alfred Stieglitz, Hartley began his career by painting the mountains of western Maine. He subsequently led a peripatetic life, traveling throughout Europe and North America and only occasionally visiting his native state. By midlife, however, his itinerant existence had taken an emotional toll, and he confided to Stieglitz that he wanted “so earnestly a ‘place’ to be.” Finally returning to the state in his later years, he transformed his identity from urbane sophisticate to “the painter from Maine.” But while Maine has played a clear and defining role in Hartley’s art, not until now has this relationship been studied with the breadth and richness it warrants. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Verdana} Marsden Hartley’s Maine is the first in-depth discussion of Hartley’s complex and shifting relationship to his native state. Illustrated with works from throughout the painter’s career, it provides a nuanced understanding of Hartley’s artistic range, from the exhilarating Post-Impressionist landscapes of his early years to the late, roughly rendered paintings of Maine and its people. The absorbing essays examine Hartley’s view of Maine as a place of light and darkness whose spirit imbued his art, which encompassed buoyant coastal views, mournful mountain vistas, and portraits of Mainers. An illustrated chronology provides an overview of Hartley’s life, juxtaposing major personal incidents with concurrent events in Maine’s history. For Hartley, who was strongly influenced by such artists as Paul Cézanne, Winslow Homer, and Albert Pinkham Ryder, Maine was an enduring source of inspiration, one powerfully intertwined with his past, his cultural milieu, and his desire to create a regional expression of American modernism.
Category: Art

Religion In Human Evolution

Author : Robert N. Bellah
ISBN : 9780674063099
Genre : Religion
File Size : 86.70 MB
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This ambitious book probes our biological past to discover the kinds of lives that human beings have imagined were worth living. Bellah’s theory goes deep into cultural and genetic evolution to identify a range of capacities (communal dancing, storytelling, theorizing) whose emergence made religious development possible in the first millennium BCE.
Category: Religion

History Of Western Philosophy

Author : Bertrand Russell
ISBN : 9781135692919
Genre : Philosophy
File Size : 65.53 MB
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Now in a special gift edition, and featuring a brand new foreword by Anthony Gottlieb, this is a dazzlingly unique exploration of the works of significant philosophers throughout the ages and a definitive must-have title that deserves a revered place on every bookshelf.
Category: Philosophy